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Divine Sovereignty and Human Freedom: The Great Puzzle

Posted on Mar 29, 2015 in Featured, Philosophy, Theology | 0 comments

by David Gunn – The relationship between divine sovereignty and human responsibility (or free moral agency) has long been a fixation for me. At one time I held to a strongly Calvinistic position complete with meticulous predestination. During the course of my studies I’ve adjusted my perspective numerous times; these days I hold to a basically Chaferian soteriology and lean tentatively toward a general sovereignty model.[1] I think these approaches come closest to capturing and synthesizing what the Bible has to say on the subject. But it always fascinates me that like-minded theologians and exeg­­­­­etes, committed to the same presuppositional and methodological commitments, can come to such sharply divergent views on this subject. I think this is because the logical and theological problems involved in this question are daunting and perhaps insuperable in this life. Here’s why: In his...

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An Apologetic to the Objectivist Worldview of Ayn Rand

Posted on Jan 29, 2015 in Apologetics, Featured, Philosophy | 1 comment

by Jennifer Ewing –“Who is John Galt?” this is the pressing mystery in Rand’s bestseller Atlas Shrugged. He is Ayn Rand’s ideal thinking man; an inventor and philosopher who decided to organize intellectuals to strike against the corrupt and parasitic societies and governments. For the objectivist this is “the concept of man as a heroic being, with his own happiness as the moral purpose of his life, with productive achievement as his noblest activity, and reason as his only absolute.”[1] The main good in this philosophy is man’s life; and man’s pursuit of personal happiness cannot be sacrificed to support people who are not productive. As such, Rand considers selfishness to be a virtue. In the novel, the disappearance of Galt and other industrialists is explained: ‘If you saw Atlas, the giant who holds the world on his shoulders,...

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A Theology of Planning, Part 3

Posted on Mar 22, 2014 in Bible, Philosophy, Priorities, Theology | 1 comment

by Daniel Goepfrich –Having been part of a research group for an eBook that is being written on the “theology of planning,” I am answering seven questions about planning that the author posed to us. Because of the length, I’m sharing my thoughts in three posts. You can find the original answers in Part 1 and Part 2. I encourage you to share your own thoughts in the comments.   6. How does God use failed plans? An even better question might be: When taking God’s sovereignty into consideration, is there such a thing as a failed plan? It is better to say, “How is God glorified when a plan works differently than I had anticipated?” Romans 15:22-29 and Acts 16:6-10 are great examples of God causing Paul’s plans to change in order that he could do something greater. The simple reason is that God knows far...

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A Theology of Planning, Part 2

Posted on Feb 4, 2014 in Bible, Philosophy, Priorities, Theology | 1 comment

by Daniel Goepfrich – Having been part of a research group for an eBook that is being written on the “theology of planning,” I am answering seven questions about planning that the author posed to us. Because of the length, I’m sharing my thoughts in three posts. You can find Part 1 here. 3. Is planning the work of one person or many people? Depending on what is being planned, it could be either. Some plans are very simple and don’t require anyone else, while others certainly do. A good principle to follow is: the wider the influence of the thing being planned, the more necessary the planning (and probably people). “Plans are established by counsel, so make war with guidance.” Proverbs 20:18 “With regard to our brother Apollos: I strongly encouraged him to visit you with the other brothers, but it was...

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The Afterlife, Part 1

Posted on Jan 16, 2014 in Heaven and Hell, Philosophy, Salvation, Theology | 0 comments

by Gary Gilley – Introduction A few years ago a virtually unknown author, Betty Eadie, sprang to immediate celebrity status by writing the runaway best seller entitled Embraced by the Light. This was the most recent and popular book detailing the experiences of people who believe that they had died, gone to the next life and then returned to this world. Here are some of the things that Eadie said we have to look forward to after death: A nonjudgmental “savior of light” who will ultimately forgive everyone (universalism). We therefore have no reason to fear death. Returning home: Our human spirit has eternally existed in heaven. Some spirits have chosen to go to earth, either to fulfill some mission or to learn lessons that would help them mature. When we come to earth we often come as friends or...

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Hermeneutics and the Spiritual Life

Posted on Jan 10, 2014 in Hermeneutics, Israel, Philosophy, Spiritual Formation | 2 comments

by Steve Spurlin – One’s hermeneutic practice is a topic of vital importance.  Everyone has a hermeneutic practice whether they know it or not and whether they are able to explain it or not.  What is the term hermeneutic(s) you may ask.  Good question. The term hermeneutic (hur ma noo tik) may be defined as the science of interpretation, in particular the interpretation of Scripture.  When a Christian, or anyone else for that matter, reads Scripture he or she employs a hermeneutic method in order to determine and understand what the text is saying.  Since Scripture is God-breathed (2 Tim. 3:16-17) and represents His self-revelation to man (Heb. 1:1-2) it is imperative that the reader correctly interprets its message.  Also, since God has spoken it is not at all difficult to determine why; He desires to have mankind come to...

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